Tombstone Tuesday: Need a Sign of Spring

16 02 2010

This is getting ridiculous. As I am sitting here, it is *still* snowing. More snow on top of the 8 inches we got yesterday — which was on top of the 9 inches we got last week. I need Spring!

With that in mind, this week’s Tombstone Tuesday features the tombstone of Susan Esenbock Johns (1948-2006) in Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky. The flower is stained glass. Until I went to Lexington a couple of years ago, I had never seen stained glass incorporated into a tombstone, but there were numerous ones there.

Susan Esenbock Johns, Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky. Photo by Amy Crow, 15 September 2007. Copyright 2007, Amy Johnson Crow; all rights reserved.

If you ever have a chance to go to Lexington Cemetery, be certain to have your camera, fresh batteries, and plenty of space on your memory card. In the morning and afternoon I was there, I took nearly 200 photos. I have some of my favorite Lexington stones posted on my Flickr page.





Valentine’s Day in the Cemetery

14 02 2010

This is the largest heart I have ever seen carved into a tombstone. Top that, Hallmark!

Abraham Smith, Havens Cemetery, Franklin County, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 3 Sept 2007. Copyright Amy Crow, all rights reserved.

Abraham Smith is buried in Havens Cemetery on Reynoldsburg-New Albany Road in Jefferson Township, Franklin County, Ohio. He died in July 1837. Although the stone is ornately carved, the inscription is very difficult to read.





Zinc tombstones, Union Grove Cemetery

15 01 2009

 

Monumental Bronze Company inscription, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

Monumental Bronze Company inscription, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

I love zinc (aka white bronze) tombstones. I find a bit ironic that cemeteries across the country discouraged or banned the installation of them because they were seen as being tacky, but now they are the most legible tombstones. 

 

Zinc/white bronze tombstones were manufactured by the Monumental Bronze Company of Bridgeport, Connecticut. Subsidiaries/distributors in Detroit, Chicago, and Des Moines and their work can be found across the United States. However, their years of production were very short — 1875 to 1912.

Customers could chose a variety of motifs. Panels on the sides of the marker could bear words or motifs (and sometimes both). Customization, such as the inscription, was cast in separate plates that would be screwed into a standard base.

Both of these tombstones are found in Union Grove Cemetery in Canal Winchester, Ohio. The taller tombstone for the Rager family is a more typical zinc tombstone. The Grace Courtright marker with the praying child is much more unusual. It stands approximately 2.5 feet tall. I’ve never seen another zinc marker like it. If you’ve seen another one, please leave a comment and let me know.

 

Rager monument, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

Rager monument, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

 

Grace Courtright marker, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

Grace Courtright marker, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.





Hog to Heaven

15 11 2008

Some graveyard enthusiasts tend to gloss over contemporary tombstones, but I have to admit a certain fascination with them. Some are so personalized that future generations will be able to get a very intimate look into their lives. One stone that made my jaw drop was this one in York Street Cemetery in Licking County. Since then, I’ve seen other motorcycle tombstones, but none as large or as detailed as this Harley-Davidson. (It isn’t full-size, but it is close.)

Harris Harley-Davidson tombstone, York Street Cemetery, Licking County, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 31 August 2007. All rights reserved.

Harris Harley-Davidson tombstone, York Street Cemetery, Licking County, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 31 August 2007. All rights reserved.








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