Zinc tombstones, Union Grove Cemetery

15 01 2009

 

Monumental Bronze Company inscription, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

Monumental Bronze Company inscription, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

I love zinc (aka white bronze) tombstones. I find a bit ironic that cemeteries across the country discouraged or banned the installation of them because they were seen as being tacky, but now they are the most legible tombstones. 

 

Zinc/white bronze tombstones were manufactured by the Monumental Bronze Company of Bridgeport, Connecticut. Subsidiaries/distributors in Detroit, Chicago, and Des Moines and their work can be found across the United States. However, their years of production were very short — 1875 to 1912.

Customers could chose a variety of motifs. Panels on the sides of the marker could bear words or motifs (and sometimes both). Customization, such as the inscription, was cast in separate plates that would be screwed into a standard base.

Both of these tombstones are found in Union Grove Cemetery in Canal Winchester, Ohio. The taller tombstone for the Rager family is a more typical zinc tombstone. The Grace Courtright marker with the praying child is much more unusual. It stands approximately 2.5 feet tall. I’ve never seen another zinc marker like it. If you’ve seen another one, please leave a comment and let me know.

 

Rager monument, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

Rager monument, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

 

Grace Courtright marker, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

Grace Courtright marker, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

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Our Only Son

10 01 2009

This moving tribute to Samuel J. Dick, “Our only son,” is in Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus.

Samuel J. Dick tombstone, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.

Samuel J. Dick tombstone, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.

“Our only Son / Saml. J. Dick / 1st. Lieut. 18th U.S.I. / born / Dec. 28, 1836 / killed / Dec. 28, 1864”

Samuel J. Dick was born in Pennsylvania. In 1860, 23-year-old Samuel was living in the 3rd Ward of Columbus with Joseph (age 56) and Martha (age 54) Dick. The only other person with that surname living in the household was 19-year-old Jennie.(1) Although it isn’t proof, my theory is that Joseph and Martha were Samuel’s parents.

Samuel enlisted in the 18th U.S. Infantry in 1861 and became a 2nd Lieutenant in June 1862. He was “engaged in battle at Murfreesboro’, action of Hoover’s Gap, and battle of Chickamauga. Mustering Officer of a Division, 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, 1863 and 1864. Engaged at the siege of Chattanooga, Atlanta campaign, and in several Cavalry actions.(2) He died of disease in Nashville, Tennessee on December 28, 1864.(3)

Samuel’s mother applied for a pension based on her son’s service on 12 June 1865 (application 97401). The pension index card does not list a certificate number, likely indicated that her pension claim was denied.(4)

Sources:
1. Joseph Dick household, 1860 federal census (population), Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio, p. 202, nos. 1163/1273. Image viewed on FamilySearch.org.
2. Guy V. Henry, Military Records of Civilian Appointments in the United States Army, vol. II, (New York: D. Van Nostrand, 1873), 79.
3. Thomas V. Van Horne, George Henry Thomas, and Edward Ruger, History of the Army of the Cumberland (Cincinnati, OH: R. Clarke, 1875), 437.
4. Samuel J. Dick, Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900, National Archives publication T289. Image viewed on Footnote.com.





Mr. and Mrs. and Mrs. Smith

7 01 2009

No, the title of this post is not a typo. It reflects the people listed on this interesting tombstone in Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus. I wish my ancestors’ tombstones had so much information!

David, Rhoda and Harriet Smith, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo taken by Amy Crow, 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.

David, Rhoda and Harriet Smith, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo taken by Amy Crow, 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.


In memory of
David Smith, son of John Smith and Elizabeth Campbell Smith of Francestown, N.H, born Oct. 2, 1785 and died Feb. 1, 1865
also
of Rhoda S. Smith, wife of David Smith and daughter of James F. Mitchell and Hannah Leitch [?] Mitchell of Haverhill, Mass, born August 22, 1785 and died August 19, 1819
also
of Harriet B. Smith, wife of David Smith and sister of Rhoda S. Smith, born December 23, 1802 and died August 11, 1833.