Valentine’s Day in the Cemetery

14 02 2010

This is the largest heart I have ever seen carved into a tombstone. Top that, Hallmark!

Abraham Smith, Havens Cemetery, Franklin County, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 3 Sept 2007. Copyright Amy Crow, all rights reserved.

Abraham Smith is buried in Havens Cemetery on Reynoldsburg-New Albany Road in Jefferson Township, Franklin County, Ohio. He died in July 1837. Although the stone is ornately carved, the inscription is very difficult to read.





Tombstone Tuesday: Frank English, 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery

26 01 2010

Frank English was born in Alexandria, Virginia on 10 April 1847. His death certificate lists his mother as Mary Nevins and father as “don’t know.” Frank was mustered into Company B, 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery on 15 May 1863 and mustered out 25 July 1865 at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was living at 262 S. Monroe in Columbus when he died 2 August 1918. He is buried in section 74 of Greenlawn Cemetery.

He received a pension for his Civil War service (application 851128, certificate 612950), and his widow also received a pension (application 1125119, certificate 866832). He is a part of my 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery project on WeRelate.org; his specific page can be found here. If you have any additional information about Frank or any other member of the 1st OHA, please feel free to add it to the site.

Tombstone of Frank English, Section 74, Greenlawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo taken 29 Nov 2009 by Amy Crow. Copyright 2009, Amy Crow; all rights reserved.

I plan to add more tombstones of Civil War veterans as we move closer to the Sesquicentennial next year.





Live is a span, a fleeting hour

10 06 2009

Asbury Cemetery in Columbus is not only well maintained, but they have done a good job of repairing some of the older tombstones, such as this one for Zechariah Algire. Despite the top 3/4 of the stone having broken off at one point, it is still remarkably legible.

The top features a broken column, symbolizing a life cut short. It is also signed by the stonecarver, J. W. Jungkurth of Lithopolis.

Zechariah Algire, Asbury Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 9 June 2009; all rights reserved.

Zechariah Algire, Asbury Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 9 June 2009; all rights reserved.

“In memory
of
ZECHARIAH
ALGIRE
born Decemr 1st 1813
died March 27th 1844
aged 30 years,
3 months and
26 days.
Life is a span, a fleeting hour.
How soon the vapour flies.
Man is a tender, transient flow’r
That e’en in blooming dies.
J. W. Jungkurth
Lithopolis”





Tombstone Tuesday: John C. Coble, “lovely bud so young and fair”

9 06 2009

[NOTE: I also published this on Amy’s Genealogy, etc. Blog.]

John C. Coble tombstone, Asbury Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo taken by Amy Crow 9 June 2009; all rights reserved.

John C. Coble tombstone, Asbury Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo taken by Amy Crow 9 June 2009; all rights reserved.

This tombstone is in Asbury Cemetery in Madison Township, Franklin County, Ohio, near the intersection of Noe-Bixby Road and Winchester Pike. It is in excellent condition. I love the epitaph.

“In
memory of
John C.
Son of John and
Jane Coble.
born Augt 3th 1838.
died Septr. 17th 1840.
aged 2 years,
1 month and 14 days.
This lovely bud so young
and fair,
Called hence by early doom
Just came to show how
sweet a flower
In paradise would bloom.”





Zinc tombstones, Union Grove Cemetery

15 01 2009

 

Monumental Bronze Company inscription, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

Monumental Bronze Company inscription, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

I love zinc (aka white bronze) tombstones. I find a bit ironic that cemeteries across the country discouraged or banned the installation of them because they were seen as being tacky, but now they are the most legible tombstones. 

 

Zinc/white bronze tombstones were manufactured by the Monumental Bronze Company of Bridgeport, Connecticut. Subsidiaries/distributors in Detroit, Chicago, and Des Moines and their work can be found across the United States. However, their years of production were very short — 1875 to 1912.

Customers could chose a variety of motifs. Panels on the sides of the marker could bear words or motifs (and sometimes both). Customization, such as the inscription, was cast in separate plates that would be screwed into a standard base.

Both of these tombstones are found in Union Grove Cemetery in Canal Winchester, Ohio. The taller tombstone for the Rager family is a more typical zinc tombstone. The Grace Courtright marker with the praying child is much more unusual. It stands approximately 2.5 feet tall. I’ve never seen another zinc marker like it. If you’ve seen another one, please leave a comment and let me know.

 

Rager monument, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

Rager monument, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

 

Grace Courtright marker, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.

Grace Courtright marker, Union Grove Cemetery, Canal Winchester, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 24 June 2008; all rights reserved.





Mr. and Mrs. and Mrs. Smith

7 01 2009

No, the title of this post is not a typo. It reflects the people listed on this interesting tombstone in Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus. I wish my ancestors’ tombstones had so much information!

David, Rhoda and Harriet Smith, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo taken by Amy Crow, 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.

David, Rhoda and Harriet Smith, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo taken by Amy Crow, 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.


In memory of
David Smith, son of John Smith and Elizabeth Campbell Smith of Francestown, N.H, born Oct. 2, 1785 and died Feb. 1, 1865
also
of Rhoda S. Smith, wife of David Smith and daughter of James F. Mitchell and Hannah Leitch [?] Mitchell of Haverhill, Mass, born August 22, 1785 and died August 19, 1819
also
of Harriet B. Smith, wife of David Smith and sister of Rhoda S. Smith, born December 23, 1802 and died August 11, 1833.





Woody Hayes

18 11 2008

[originally posted on Amy’s Genealogy, etc. Blog] In honor of this Saturday’s Ohio State/Michigan game (the greatest rivalry in college football!), I’m featuring the grave of legendary OSU football Woody Hayes. Woody and his wife Anne are buried in Union Cemetery in Columbus, not far from the OSU campus.

Although he will always be known for being the coach of the Buckeyes, Woody was also an incredible history buff. He also served in the U.S. Navy in World War II and left the service with the rank of lieutenant commander. An excellent biography of Woody Hayes can be found on the WOSU-TV website.

Wayne Woodrow "Woody" Hayes, Union Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 29 August 2008, all rights reserved.

Wayne Woodrow (Woody) Hayes, Union Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, 29 August 2008, all rights reserved.

The verse reads:

“And in the night of death, hope sees a star
and listening love hears the rustle of a wing.”