Tombstone Tuesday: Frank English, 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery

26 01 2010

Frank English was born in Alexandria, Virginia on 10 April 1847. His death certificate lists his mother as Mary Nevins and father as “don’t know.” Frank was mustered into Company B, 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery on 15 May 1863 and mustered out 25 July 1865 at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was living at 262 S. Monroe in Columbus when he died 2 August 1918. He is buried in section 74 of Greenlawn Cemetery.

He received a pension for his Civil War service (application 851128, certificate 612950), and his widow also received a pension (application 1125119, certificate 866832). He is a part of my 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery project on WeRelate.org; his specific page can be found here. If you have any additional information about Frank or any other member of the 1st OHA, please feel free to add it to the site.

Tombstone of Frank English, Section 74, Greenlawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo taken 29 Nov 2009 by Amy Crow. Copyright 2009, Amy Crow; all rights reserved.

I plan to add more tombstones of Civil War veterans as we move closer to the Sesquicentennial next year.





Our Only Son

10 01 2009

This moving tribute to Samuel J. Dick, “Our only son,” is in Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus.

Samuel J. Dick tombstone, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.

Samuel J. Dick tombstone, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo by Amy Crow, taken 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.

“Our only Son / Saml. J. Dick / 1st. Lieut. 18th U.S.I. / born / Dec. 28, 1836 / killed / Dec. 28, 1864”

Samuel J. Dick was born in Pennsylvania. In 1860, 23-year-old Samuel was living in the 3rd Ward of Columbus with Joseph (age 56) and Martha (age 54) Dick. The only other person with that surname living in the household was 19-year-old Jennie.(1) Although it isn’t proof, my theory is that Joseph and Martha were Samuel’s parents.

Samuel enlisted in the 18th U.S. Infantry in 1861 and became a 2nd Lieutenant in June 1862. He was “engaged in battle at Murfreesboro’, action of Hoover’s Gap, and battle of Chickamauga. Mustering Officer of a Division, 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, 1863 and 1864. Engaged at the siege of Chattanooga, Atlanta campaign, and in several Cavalry actions.(2) He died of disease in Nashville, Tennessee on December 28, 1864.(3)

Samuel’s mother applied for a pension based on her son’s service on 12 June 1865 (application 97401). The pension index card does not list a certificate number, likely indicated that her pension claim was denied.(4)

Sources:
1. Joseph Dick household, 1860 federal census (population), Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio, p. 202, nos. 1163/1273. Image viewed on FamilySearch.org.
2. Guy V. Henry, Military Records of Civilian Appointments in the United States Army, vol. II, (New York: D. Van Nostrand, 1873), 79.
3. Thomas V. Van Horne, George Henry Thomas, and Edward Ruger, History of the Army of the Cumberland (Cincinnati, OH: R. Clarke, 1875), 437.
4. Samuel J. Dick, Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900, National Archives publication T289. Image viewed on Footnote.com.





Mr. and Mrs. and Mrs. Smith

7 01 2009

No, the title of this post is not a typo. It reflects the people listed on this interesting tombstone in Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus. I wish my ancestors’ tombstones had so much information!

David, Rhoda and Harriet Smith, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo taken by Amy Crow, 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.

David, Rhoda and Harriet Smith, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Photo taken by Amy Crow, 2 April 2007; all rights reserved.


In memory of
David Smith, son of John Smith and Elizabeth Campbell Smith of Francestown, N.H, born Oct. 2, 1785 and died Feb. 1, 1865
also
of Rhoda S. Smith, wife of David Smith and daughter of James F. Mitchell and Hannah Leitch [?] Mitchell of Haverhill, Mass, born August 22, 1785 and died August 19, 1819
also
of Harriet B. Smith, wife of David Smith and sister of Rhoda S. Smith, born December 23, 1802 and died August 11, 1833.





Veterans Day

11 11 2008

Last April, I took the better part of a day and went through Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus. In honor of Veterans Day, I am posting one of my photos from that day.

Veterans Section, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus. Photo by Amy Crow, 2 April 2007. All rights reserved.

Veterans Section, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus. Photo by Amy Crow, 2 April 2007. All rights reserved.





Capt. Daniel S. Lewis, Green Lawn Cemetery

21 10 2008

 

Capt. Daniel S. Lewis, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus. Photograph taken by Amy Crow, August 8, 2008. All rights reserved.

Capt. Daniel S. Lewis, Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus. Photograph taken by Amy Crow, August 8, 2008. All rights reserved.

This impressive monument is in Green Lawn Cemetery in Columbus. The imagery on the stone immediately tell you it is the grave of a firefighter — the hydrant with the hose that outlines the stone, a helmet, a ladder, an axe, and a lantern. The inscription reads:

 

In Memory Of

Capt. Daniel S. Lewis

Born May 15, 1854

Entered the Service

Oct. 18, 1881

Gave his life to the city

April 26, 1903

Lewis, captain of Engine Company No. 11, was killed fighting a fire in the Brunson and Union Company buildings at the corner of Long Street and High Street in downtown Columbus. According to a newspaper account, he was killed when a wall collapsed and fell on him. “His body was cremated in the ruins.”

“The fire was attended by many exciting incidents, the most thrilling being the rescue of Philip Nation, a grocer, from his apartments on the fourth floor of the Brunson Building where he had been hemmed in by flames. The fire started in the Brunson Building and its progress was fanned by a brisk wind from the north. This building was occupied on the ground floor by the Walkover Shoe Company, Tallmadge Hardware Company, and Bott Brothers’ saloon. The upper floors were occupied mainly as living apartments, the exceptions being the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union rest room and the art studios of Maurice Hague and H. P. Hayden.

“Smoke was first seen issuing from the basement under the saloon. The fire smoldered for half an hour and the firemen thought they had it under control, when the flames suddenly burst from an upper story”

Source:

The New York Times, April 27, 1903, p. 1. Available online at http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=940DE5DD1F30E733A25754C2A9629C946297D6CF